'Mother!' director Darren Aronofsky answers our burning questions (Spoilers!)

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'Mother!' director Darren Aronofsky answers our burning questions (Spoilers!)

Darren Aronofsky</a>’s nightmarish thriller Mother!lost out at the box office this weekend to a much more traditional one-word horror film, It. Even so, there’s little doubt that Mother!, a violent Biblical allegory&nbsp;that was greeted with awe and bewilderment by critics, is a film that audiences will be discussing, dissecting, and arguing about for a very long time. During the press junket for Mother! (which stars Jennifer Lawrence as the title character, Javier Bardem as her unnamed husband, and Michelle Pfeiffer and Ed Harris as their mysterious, uninvited houseguests), Yahoo Entertainment had the opportunity to present Aronofsky with some of our burning questions. Here, a spoiler-filled Q&amp;A that addresses whether Bardem is a villain, what Mother! has to do with The Giving Tree, and how Kristen Wiig (whose character is credited as “herald”) ended up in the film’s jaw-dropping third act.” data-reactid=”18″>Darren Aronofsky’s nightmarish thriller Mother!lost out at the box office this weekend to a much more traditional one-word horror film, It. Even so, there’s little doubt that Mother!, a violent Biblical allegory that was greeted with awe and bewilderment by critics, is a film that audiences will be discussing, dissecting, and arguing about for a very long time. During the press junket for Mother! (which stars Jennifer Lawrence as the title character, Javier Bardem as her unnamed husband, and Michelle Pfeiffer and Ed Harris as their mysterious, uninvited houseguests), Yahoo Entertainment had the opportunity to present Aronofsky with some of our burning questions. Here, a spoiler-filled Q&A that addresses whether Bardem is a villain, what Mother! has to do with The Giving Tree, and how Kristen Wiig (whose character is credited as “herald”) ended up in the film’s jaw-dropping third act.

endorsed Shel Silverstein’s book The Giving Tree on Twitter</a>. Is Mother! a dark version of The Giving Tree?
I think The Giving Tree is really dark. I’m sorry! It’s amazing that that is one of the best-selling children’s books of all time. It’s really, really a sad story, and I remember reading it the first time for my child and getting to the end going, “What? That’s the end?” [Laughs] Because I didn’t remember it from my own childhood. I think Shel is an incredible poet, and we were very aware of it when we were making this movie, because we were telling a story that had similar ideas behind it.” data-reactid=”19″>You recently endorsed Shel Silverstein’s book The Giving Tree on Twitter. Is Mother! a dark version of The Giving Tree?
I think The Giving Tree is really dark. I’m sorry! It’s amazing that that is one of the best-selling children’s books of all time. It’s really, really a sad story, and I remember reading it the first time for my child and getting to the end going, “What? That’s the end?” [Laughs] Because I didn’t remember it from my own childhood. I think Shel is an incredible poet, and we were very aware of it when we were making this movie, because we were telling a story that had similar ideas behind it.

Barack Obama in my dream last night?” or, “What was Oprah Winfrey doing there?” [laughs] But that thing happens for people, and I kind of liked the idea that the audience for a second is like, “Whoa! What’s – This is –“ and then just gets lost in it. So for me it’s just entertainment value, because the bottom line for me is, I’m trying to keep an audience at the edge of their seat for two hours. So I’m happy to use all bells and whistles to get that done.” data-reactid=”21″>Why is Kristen Wiig in this movie?
I don’t want to talk about it too much because it’s a bit of a spoiler. I love that it’s a surprise. But I just needed someone for that role, and I thought, the way I explain it is the film is very much kind of dream logic, or nightmare logic, and within dreams and nightmares sometimes certain faces pop in and you’re like, “Why was Barack Obama in my dream last night?” or, “What was Oprah Winfrey doing there?” [laughs] But that thing happens for people, and I kind of liked the idea that the audience for a second is like, “Whoa! What’s – This is –“ and then just gets lost in it. So for me it’s just entertainment value, because the bottom line for me is, I’m trying to keep an audience at the edge of their seat for two hours. So I’m happy to use all bells and whistles to get that done.

the most famous book in the world. </a>” data-reactid=”23″>Can you give us some hints?
I think the real way to start is by looking at the credits. The credits have a lot of hints. And once you figure out what everyone represents, it will all unfold. But every single detail, even lines of dialogue, is taken from the most famous book in the world.