'Wonderstruck' director Todd Haynes on making a movie for kids and his lost Shakespeare debut

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'Wonderstruck' director Todd Haynes on making a movie for kids and his lost Shakespeare debut

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Oakes Fegley and Jaden Michael in Wonderstruck. (Photo: Roadside Attractions/Amazon/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

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Wonderstruck director Todd Haynes. (Photo: Mary Cybulski/Roadside Attractions/Amazon/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

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Julianne Moore and Fegley in Wonderstruck. (Photo: Mary Cybulski/Roadside Attractions/Amazon/Courtesy of Everett Collection)

Bootleg versions of Superstar can be found on YouTube.)” data-reactid=”77″>Besides stoking his own childhood movie memories, Wonderstruck evokes another aspect of Haynes’s filmmaking past: The climax consists of a lengthy sequence that’s animated using three-dimensional miniatures made out of little tchotchkes and children’s toys. For those familiar with the director’s work — and that’s probably not the under-10 set — it instantly evokes memories of his breakthrough short film, Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story, which told the tragic life story of singer Karen Carpenter using Barbie dolls. Completed in 1987, when Haynes was 26 years old, Superstar became an instant cult sensation when it started screening at festivals the following year. Despite the critical raves, the film has never been publicly available in the three decades since its premiere because or an ongoing legal dispute over Haynes’s use of the singer’s music without proper licensing. (Bootleg versions of Superstar can be found on YouTube.)